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Blog — anatomy of a print

Anatomy of a Print: Windward

Posted by Jordan Kushins on

Anatomy of a Print: Windward

A real-life, ultra-gnarled cypress fascinated Eric for a looong time before he finally decided to immortalize it in linoleum. Here’s how an Outer Sunset icon came to life as Windward.  Eric: “I first noticed this tree like six years ago when I was running the trail between the two Great Highways. It’s right at the end of Noriega Street, and I love the story it tells. It survived even though it’s been so deformed. The wind—it just can’t take the wind. I got inspired to turn it into a print when I went to the end of Noriega street to shoot...

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Anatomy of a Print: An Eric Rewitzer/Paul Madonna Collaboration

Posted by Jordan Kushins on

Anatomy of a Print: An Eric Rewitzer/Paul Madonna Collaboration

We've got a lot of love for ArtSpan's Open Studios. It's where Eric and Annie got their creative kickstart ten years ago--from a makeshift gallery in their Outer Richmond garage--and now, a decade on, it's incredible to see how far they've come. This year, Eric teamed up with local artist (and good pal) Paul Madonna to produce something special for the weekend festivities. For this edition of Anatomy of a Print, we've giving a glimpse behind the scenes of how these two combined their talents to create this incredible collaboration.  Take it away, Eric! "Paul drew the background--a scene from the...

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Anatomy of a Print: Mothra

Posted by Jordan Kushins on

    In the beginning, there was Godzilla; then King Ghidorah came to cause trouble; next, Gamera started wreaking havoc. And now, after months of anticipation and preparation, Mothra finally touched down in San Francisco; the fourth in Eric’s Creature Feature series of iconic kaiju going nuts in our city by the bay. Before the benevolent bug debuted at last weekend’s Roadworks Printing Festival—yup, she was pressed under a seven-ton steamroller on Rhode Island Street, right outside the SF Center for the Book—Eric conceptualized and carried out absolutely everything about the work of art, from layout to design to the carving itself....

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